RISSUE

The RISSUE is a magazine created by student writers. Find the latest edition here!

RISSUE Magazine

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Highlighted articles

Cube houses

Rotterdam is the second largest city in the Netherlands, despite being nearly destroyed in World War II by a German attack in 1940. Rotterdam has the biggest port in Europe, and was in fact the busiest port in the world from 1962 to 2004. The city is known for its rich history, but and also for its modern architecture, which has won multiple awards. On many of the city’s sidewalks you will find red lights with a fire logo. These show the outline of the raging fire that decimated the city center.

International language

The RISS is an international school that is proud of the many cultures represented on its grounds. Approximately 20 different languages are spoken on the senior campus, and students have formed an accepting and internation- ally-minded community between the school walls.

Art student

Dutch artists. You’ve seen their works. You’ve at least heard of them. Van Gogh. Vermeer. Rembrandt. Escher. Ring a bell? In fact, this metaphorical bell might be ringing for two reasons. You probably recognise these names as the four houses of RISS. RISS incorporates a plethora of house events throughout the year to inspire team spirit and competition between the students.

Cemetary

The sky was cloudless and the air was balmy as we strolled to the entrance of Tyne Cot Cemetery. We (Grade Nine students and teachers) had already visited the Flanders Field Museum and the Trench Museum that morning. Our teacher told us that Tyne Cot 
 Cemetery was the final resting place of approximately 300,000 soldiers from the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth. “Please show your utmost respect,” he said. 

Leadership heart

About two years ago, my family and I visited the Dachau concentration camp in Germany. Having never seen a place like that before, it was an eye-opening experience for me. I had read about the horrors of the Holocaust and had even visited places such as Anne Frank’s house. However, I had never actually seen what happened to the Jews after being taken away by the Nazi soldiers.